CONCLUDING UNSCIENTIFIC POSTSCRIPT TO PHILOSOPHICAL FRAGMENTS PDF

In Philosophical Fragments the pseudonymous author Johannes Climacus explored the Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments. This chapter offers a reading of Søren Kierkegaard’s philosophical work Concluding Unscientific Postscript to ‘Philosophical Fragments’ to illuminate his ideas. Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, Volume 1 has ratings and 14 reviews. John said: In many ways, this book is necessary w.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Edna Hatlestad Hong Translator. Howard Vincent Hong Editor. PaperbackKierkegaard’s Writings To see what your friends ohilosophical of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, Volume 1please sign up.

Lists with This Book. Aug 04, John Lucy rated it it was amazing. In many ways, this book is necessary while also being provocative. Whether you are Christian or not, though particularly if you are, this book could very well be necessary. D In many ways, this book is necessary while also being provocative.

Does that mean those people are Christian?

Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments – Wikiquote

Do those things make one a Christian? The answer lies in existence. To acknowledge that we are existing, first of all, which in itself is a paradox, and to accept that paradox rather than try to explain it.

Beyond that, to accept that we are existing before and with God; to live our own existence with fear and trembling before God. What does this mean for us?

It means that existence and especially Christianity, or really any religion, are much more difficult than we make it out to be. Throughout Christendom what S. Is your very existence lived in inwardness with God? Or are you trying to make sense of things, trying to achieve something in life, imposing your will or ideas on others, seeking love or success?

This is a necessary and provocative challenge. If you want a shorter and slightly easier read you can check out S. All his other writings point to or at what he here details. Read it, wrestle with it, and live inwardly as an existing person. Dec 17, Lynn Silsby rated it it was amazing.

2010.01.19

Most philosophers are bad writers. Excellent thinkers but really a drudge to get through. Kierkegaard’s a beautiful writer. A large part of why I put the “reluctant” in the little label I apply to myself – “reluctant atheist. Jun 21, Peter rated it it was amazing.

Kierkegaard was the prophet of modern subjectivity, and this book is genius. Dude really could have used an editor. This is like listening to the smartest person you’ve ever met thinking out loud about Hegel and Christianity for 12 hours straight. Jul 20, Dan Yingst rated it it was amazing Shelves: Feb 29, Dustyn Hessie rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Most Ppl on my Friends List. My advice to any prospective reader of Kierkegaard is: Do not read his work On the other hand, in this book, I deem it useful for any reader to go on ahead and indulge.

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Properly, Kierkegaard is a philosopher for everyman insofar as most of his work directs it’s attention to the process of becoming, and not necessarily the intended “end,” persay.

In this way, he can appeal to any reader simply delighted in the complexity and movement of language, and not necessarily just the bones-and My advice to any prospective reader of Kierkegaard is: In this way, he can appeal to any reader simply delighted in the complexity and movement of language, and not necessarily just the bones-and-grit madcore thinkaholic. He touches on, as he usually does, The Age: Kierkegaard covers so many relevant problems and provides so much glory for the mind that it is almost appalling that he has not gotten the recognition he rightfully deserves.

But then again, isn’t it precisely covered in Pessoa’s quote that, “Men hate truth,” that we find this sort of drift away from that which is spiritual a high category of existence that Kierkegaard grounds his philosophy in so well and so lyrically and cumulative momentum for that which is quite trivial and arbitrary such as bourgeois politics, economic frivolity that results in “hidden” violence, etc.

Above everything else, I think it’s fair that I say that, while I may not be Christian or even a Philosophy major for that matter, Kiekegaard’s writings in this book are intensely enlightening.

Maybe its advantageous unscientifi read Kiekegaard from a semi-enlightened distance? Nov 09, Mark Ellis added it. Perhaps the most difficult book I’ve read, but worth the struggle. Not for the conclkding of heart. Anything by Kierkegaard provokes conccluding frank, Christian self-examination.

I have many of his books. Jan 10, Dan Borkowski rated it it was amazing. Excellent sequel to “Philosophical Fragments”. Requires a lot of time, background information, and effort to understand and interpret, but like most of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous works, it is well-worth the time.

Jul 22, Patrick Sistrunk rated it it was amazing. Kierkegaard really threw everything but the kitchen sink into this one. I don’t even know what to say about it except Nov 30, Jay rated it really liked it Shelves: I searched the web for commentary on this text as I read it and it seems as though many people believe this text to be merely a humorous mockery of modern philosophical inquiry and not much else.

It is humorous, after all Climacus confesses that he is a humorist, yet, I believe it is an important text in which Climacus not only opposes modern speculative thought but gives critcal insight into different subjectivities while approaching the “religious” subject but never rea I searched the web for commentary on this text as I read it and it seems as though many people believe this text to be merely a humorous mockery of modern philosophical inquiry and not much else.

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It is humorous, after all Climacus confesses that he is a humorist, yet, I believe it is an important text in which Climacus not only opposes modern speculative thought but gives critcal insight into different subjectivities while approaching the “religious” subject but never reaching or claiming himself. Feb uunscientific, David Tye rated it it was amazing. My favorite of Kierkegaard’s works and the book that has had the most impact philosophically on me.

Finally broke me from slavery to the contemporary scientistic mindset. Oct 01, Dean added it. Jan 12, Andrew Votipka rated it it was amazing Shelves: Philsoophical only Kierkegaard could write postscript that’s postscipt longer than the actual book.

Chazz rated it it was amazing May 12, David Downey rated it it was amazing May 21, Carmen Camey rated it it was amazing Mar 14, Oscar rated it it was amazing Dec 29, Brian Donohue rated unscentific liked it Jul 31, Adeel rated philospphical it was amazing Feb 11, Nothing By rated it it was amazing Nov 11, Mathieu Gaius rated it it was amazing Unsclentific 30, Jenwhitson rated it it was amazing Apr 04, Andrew rated it it was amazing Jul 08, Paul Gleason rated it it was amazing Mar 31, Joe rated it it was amazing Aug 19, Paul Callister rated it it was amazing Sep 13, Thomas Ryan rated it it was amazing May 21, Suellen rated it it unscientigic amazing Jun 25, Lassetter rated it really liked it Aug poetscript, Daniel Luxemburg rated it liked it Jul 20, Daniel rated it it was amazing Jan 26, There are no discussion topics on this book yet.

Kierkegaard strongly criticised both the Hegelianism of his time and what he saw as the empty formalities of the Unscientifid of Ffragments.

Much of his work deals with religious themes such as faith in God, the institution of the Christian Church, Christian ethics and theology, and the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices.

His early work was written under various pseudonyms who present their own distinctive viewpoints in a complex dialogue. Kierkegaard left the task of discovering the meaning of his works to the reader, because “the task must be made difficult, for only the difficult inspires the noble-hearted”.

Scholars have interpreted Kierkegaard variously as an existentialist, neo-orthodoxist, postmodernist, humanist, and individualist.